Continuous Alcohol Monitoring

SCRAM CAM Provides Accountability and Encourages Compliance

  • Standalone alcohol monitoring or CAM with home curfew monitoring at the flip of a switch
  • Eliminates testing gaps—no ability to miss a test or drink around testing schedules
  • Goes where the client goes—no transportation to a testing center
  • Studies show CAM is most effective for offenders assessed with alcohol dependence or addiction
  • Works well in conjunction with treatment to enforce compliance and better identify when intervention may be needed

Transdermal Alcohol Testing Explained

While the technology that allows the SCRAM CAM bracelet to effectively test and report alcohol consumption based on transdermal testing is relatively new, the science of transdermal testing is not. Transdermal—or literally “through the skin”—has been known for decades as a reliable way to transport substances, both through absorption and excretion. In the 1920s researchers first began testing the concept of alcohol emissions through the skin. In 1985, researchers at the Indiana University School of Medicine published two studies on the subject of measuring volatile substances through the skin and measuring alcohol excretion in human perspiration. Today the science is well studied, peer-reviewed, and documented.

NHTSA Case Studies

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) released a report, Transdermal Alcohol Monitoring: Case Studies, which takes an in-depth look at the state of high-tech alcohol monitoring for drunk drivers.

The Case Studies, commissioned in 2010, profile six jurisdictions in the U.S. that are using transdermal alcohol monitors—and specifically SCRAM Continuous Alcohol Monitoring bracelets—to manage and monitor drunk drivers and other alcohol-involved offenders.